Table of Contents

 

Introduction...................................................................................................................................................p. 11

 

Chapter One: The Eight Parts of Speech...................................................................................................p. 15

Chapter Two: The Case for the Three Cases.............................................................................................p. 24

Chapter Three: The Simple Sentence.........................................................................................................p. 36

Chapter Four: The Complex Sentence.......................................................................................................p. 43

Chapter Five: The Compound Sentence....................................................................................................p. 57

Chapter Six: The Compound-Complex Sentence.....................................................................................p. 71

Chapter Seven: Decorating Sentences........................................................................................................p. 78

Chapter Eight: Verbs, Nouns' Best Friends...............................................................................................p. 92

Chapter Nine: A Moment with Verbals.....................................................................................................p. 130

Chapter Ten: The Comma............................................................................................................................p. 143

Chapter Eleven: Writing That Paper..........................................................................................................p. 164

 

Epilogue..........................................................................................................................................................p. 185

Appendix........................................................................................................................................................p. 187

Works Cited....................................................................................................................................................p. 215

Index................................................................................................................................................................p. 217

Scripture Index...............................................................................................................................................p. 223

 

from Sacred Grammar, p. 22

 

Let’s go back to Genesis 1:1a:

 

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

 

     The word that expresses an act or action is created. After locating the verb we find the subject or the word that tells who or what is doing the creating. Suppose we were tempted to say that beginning is the verb. If we know that in the beginning is a prepositional phrase, it follows that beginning is the object of the preposition in. The object of a preposition cannot be the subject of a verb because it already functions as the object of the preposition. No word at the same time can be both an object and a subject. The Parts of Speech Chart comes into play in analyzing grammatically the first sentence of the Bible. The word God names the one doing the acting. The words God created form this subject-verb cluster, the first clause in the Bible. Later, when we decorate sentences (chapter seven), we will learn other marks for subjects, verbs and objects. The nouns heavens and earth are both direct objects in this first sentence as they are the words that answer the question, created what? These words indicate the receiving of the action of the verb. Learn and write on a flash card that direct objects receive the action of the action verb. Time and again we will look back to the Parts of Speech Chart for the composing of sentences and for editing.

 

 

 

from Sacred Grammar, p. 168

 

Descriptive Writing Prior to Entering the Promised Land

 

     The book of Joshua contains dozens of verses that mention writing. I cite only one, Joshua 18:4, because Joshua himself ordered a particular kind of writing for a reason.

 

     Appoint three men from each tribe. I will send them out to make a survey of the land and to write a description of it, according to the inheritance of each. Then they will return to me.

 

Those of us who want to write well and who thrill at quality writing enjoy the imperitives of this verse:  God through Joshua tells three people from each tribe to survey the newly found territory, to write a description of it, and to return with their findings. One of the three chosen from each tribe had to be a writer who could capture the beauty, the opportunities, the wealth, and the dangers of the land in a way that would enable others to "see" what each writer saw. Each committee of three made possible the entering and the possessing of the land by means of its written description.

 

 

 

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